Monthly Archives: October 2020

Podcast: Episode 18: Understanding Movement for Reducing Pain


EPISODE 18:

​Understanding Movement for Reducing Pain


“I’ve found that when I can effectively teach my clients about their movements first, before getting into muscle conversation, the faster they get better.” In this episode of From Pain to Possibility. Susi discusses the idea of movement and understanding movement as an approach to helping a client reduce their pain.

Susi has recently been asked a lot of questions from yoga instructors about muscles. Susi has found in her years of training yoga teachers that the ones who understood muscles least were the ones who got results the most. Susi has also found that when she can effectively teach her clients about their movements first, before getting into muscle conversation, the faster they get better.

Listen, as Susi discusses how, when a client experiences a reduction in pain, they are more aware of what is working and what is not. She believes that when a client has communication and connection with their bodies, their bodies become a barometer,  their symptoms become a language, and as they spend time listening to it, they can decode it for themselves.

Suppose you want to dig into these concepts further on utilizing movement, yoga, breath, stillness as it relates to helping people out of pain? In that case, there are two upcoming opportunities for you. The first one is Solving Your Pain Puzzle at www.functionalsynergy.com/solving-the-pain-puzzle-2020, or the second one is Therapeutic Yoga Intensive at www.therapeuticyogaintensive.com.

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"I’ve found that when I can effectively teach my clients about their movements first, before getting into muscle conversation, the faster they get better" - Susi Hately


In This Episode:

[00:25] Welcome to the show!

[02:27] Susi shares the four things that need to happen for someone to reduce pain.

[04:44] The better you get, the better you need to get.

[06:13] When a client starts to experience a reduction in issues, they have a better awareness of what is working and what is not working.

[07:31] When clients communicate and connect with their bodies, they can understand how to keep the pain away. Their bodies become a barometer.

[10:06] Susi speaks about looking at a skeleton, seeing the movement, and seeing how that correlates to a person.

[12:26] When you can come at the experience from what is actually happening from a movement perspective, you and your client can agree about what is going on.

[14:19] Stay tuned because there will be an upcoming episode on understanding muscles.

[15:35] Have a great time exploring! 

"You must have an increased level of awareness because so much of the problem is in our unawareness." - Susi Hately

What You Will Learn In This Episode:

  • Understanding movement as an approach to helping clients reduce their pain
  • Communication and Connection with your body
  • Four things that need to happen for someone to reduce pain

"So, by improving the awareness of what’s actually happening in your body, then you can make a better change." - Susi Hately

Episode Transcript:

"The better you get, the better you need to get." - Susi Hately

Connect with Susi

Do you have a question or a desire for more learning opportunities at Functional Synergy?  Let's Connect!

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"Their symptoms become a language that as they spend time with it, they can decode it for themselves." - Susi Hately

Podcast: Episode 17: Diastasis Recovery


EPISODE 17:

​Diastasis Recovery


Listen, as Susi digs into the diastasis recti and uses her own personal experience to highlight some core teaching concepts that she uses when working with women who are recovering. Susi is dividing this episode into three specific time periods, early, mid, and later, and how she used her principles inside of those particular periods on this episode of From Pain to Possibility

Susi shares the key principles she uses when helping people to move better. Number one is to become aware and to nurture relaxation to bring about the idea of ease. Moving in their optimal range of motion is the second principle, and the third is focusing on the simple positions first, then moving on to more complex positions.

Listen, as Susi speaks about having no control of her abdomen after her C-section and how using a belly band was pivotal for support. At about six-weeks, Susi moved from early-stage to mid-stage postpartum and started using a Pilates reformer. She realized that her diastasis would worsen when she was compensating and wasn’t moving in a fluid, natural way, and Susi also realized she tended to overuse her obliques.  

At about the nine-month mark, Susi shifted into the later stage of recovery and started doing modified sit-ups at an angle instead of lying flat. Within a year, she felt solid through her abdomen and was ready to bring in more weight training. It wasn’t until about two years postpartum that she felt ready to run again, and within a month, she was back to running a 5k.

If you want to dig into this more, and explore more about your own diastasis and move along your recovery process, check out the Diastasis Recovery Project. If you want to work with Susi, email her at [email protected], and they will discuss the possibility of either private sessions or the Therapeutic Yoga Intensive.

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“I’m not sure if you ever stop being postpartum after you’ve had kids because the process is one that really shifts and changes us on many levels." 
- Susi Hately


In This Episode:

[00:24] Welcome to the show!

[01:06] Susi shares three time periods and how she used her principles inside each.

[02:00] Susi speaks about the key principles she uses when helping people to move better.

[03:40] Listen, as Susi defines what core stability means to her.

[05:05] The third principle is thinking and focusing on the simple positions first, then building up to the complex.

[05:48] When Susi came home from the hospital after a planned C-section, her abdomen had no control.

[07:28] Susi discusses how pivotal a belly band was for support after her surgery.

[09:52] Susi shares how she rolled out of bed, bracing with a pillow.

[10:46] At about six-weeks, she moved from an early stage of postpartum to mid-stage.

[11:54] Using a Pilates reformer was something she started during mid-stage.

[13:36] She discovered that her diastasis would worsen when she was compensated and wasn’t moving in a fluid and natural way.

[15:38] When someone moves more purely, with more precision but in an easeful way, things change in the abdomen.

[17:45] In this phase, Susi realized that she tended to overuse the obliques.

[19:35] How did your C-section play a part in this?

[22:11] Susi speaks about a book called The First Forty Days that she referred to when she ate something that caused bloating.

[22:55] At about nine months is when she shifted into the later stage of recovery.

[24:10] Susi shares that she had to go about doing sit-ups in small stages at an angle.

[25:45] Susi believes that you should wear the belly band for eight weeks, especially when you are tired.

[28:00] At the two-year mark, Susi felt ready to run. In about a month, she was back to running a 5K.

[29:54] Listen as Susi shares the Diastasis Recovery Project that she and Megan recorded.

[31:21] Thank you for listening.

"When we give a pain signal like a consistent pain signal back to the nervous system, the nervous system will respond in kind."
- Susi Hately

What You Will Learn In This Episode:

  • Core teaching concepts when working with women who are recovering
  • Key principles Susi uses when helping people to move better
  • Insights and ahas for your own process of recovery 
  • How using a belly band is pivotal for support post c-section 

"Research showed that if you could improve the tone of your abdomen, even if there is still a gap, that you could have better function." - Susi Hately

Episode Transcript:

"When you think about it, we don’t walk down the street in brace mode, expecting that someone might jump out at us." 
- Susi Hately

Connect with Susi

Do you have a question or a desire for more learning opportunities at Functional Synergy?  Let's Connect!

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Never miss a new episode!
Subscribe to the Podcast Mailing List below.

Podcast: Episode 16: The Treasures of Triangle


EPISODE 16:

The Treasures of Triangle


Why is the triangle pose blamed for issues in the spine, SI joints, and knees? Listen, as Susi explores why it's blamed and why on the flip side that the triangle is an exceptional position, especially when someone has recovered from SI joint issues, plus more in this episode of From Pain to Possibility.

Susi explores the triangle pose and describes what she has seen when people do a traditional way of moving into the pose versus how she prefers to see it done. Susi has found that her students are very surprised at how limited their hip movement is when teaching her way.

Do you know how to move correctly? Listen, as Susi discusses why most people don't have the foundation capacity or capability to do the triangle pose and what we can do about it. Susi believes that when you use smaller movements and learn how your joints move, you can quiet the compensation and move the way your body is designed to move.

The bottom line is that triangle can be horrible if you don't do it correctly. Do you want to learn how Susi does it? She is leading a two-hour course on triangle pose specifically. She will dig into some more of the pose's mechanics and dynamics, and she will walk you through some foundational movements, breathing, and awareness exercises to really explore your own self and movement. If you would like to register, go to www.functionalsynergy.com/trianglepose.

Subscribe:   iTunes   |   Spotify  

“When we borrow from one area in an attempt to become stronger, we are actually losing it from both."
- Susi Hately


In This Episode:

[00:24] Welcome to the show!

[02:04] Listen as Susi explores the triangle position.

[04:25] Susi describes what she has seen over time when people do a traditional way of moving into triangle.

[05:13] Susi shares how she likes to move into triangle.

[07:43] Listen as Susi shares a story on how she developed the way she teaches.

[09:21] Most humans doing yoga don't have the foundation capacity or capability to do the triangle pose.

[11:21] Susi discusses building up component parts and why triangle can be tremendous for people.

[14:37] The bottom line is that triangle can be horrible, it can be terrible, it's all in how you do it.

[15:54] Susi finishes the episode with a thought and a challenge with a lot of love.

[17:49] Thank you for listening and have a great time exploring.

"How we move will either add more grief to the SI joint or will be supportive."
- Susi Hately

What You Will Learn In This Episode:

  • Exploring the position of triangle: Why it's "horrible" and how it can be awesome, too. 
  • Learn the traditional way of moving into triangle and how Susi likes moving into triangle.
  • How Susi developed the way that she teaches

"When someone can't do a larger movement, chances are there are some smaller pieces of that movement they also can't do." - Susi Hately

Episode Transcript:

"The bottom line is that triangle can be horrible, triangle can be terrible, it's all in how you do it."
- Susi Hately

Connect with Susi

Do you have a question or a desire for more learning opportunities at Functional Synergy?  Let's Connect!

Subscribe to my Mailing List

Never miss a new episode!
Subscribe to the Podcast Mailing List below.

"It's just a matter of peeling it back to what's simple versus what's complex and understanding the principles of movement." - Susi Hately